look_inside
Collaboration in Libraries and Learning Environments

Dec 2012 | 224pp

Paperback
9781856048583
Price: 49.95
CILIP members price: 39.96

eBook (PDF)
9781856049511
How to buy eBooks turqoise_arrow


Share this page


Join our mailing list

Collaboration in Libraries and Learning Environments

Edited by Maxine Melling and Margaret Weaver

The changing environment in higher education requires different approaches to be taken to the provision of professional support services. This may result in the development of outsourced shared services, the convergence of many different student-facing services or the development of more active collaborative networks. This collection of essays considers the changing context and broad principles affecting the ways in which we need to manage and provide services and offers case studies of changes that have already taken place.

This book recognizes and uncovers the innovations that leaders and practitioners are implementing to transform and develop the provision of sustainable and creative support services. Such innovations are resulting in diverse models of service delivery and the development of more active collaborative networks and commercial partnerships. The essays are drawn from a broad spectrum of professionals working inside and outside library and information services as well as those responsible for leading multiply converged or joint service teams. 

Key topics include:
  • The changing higher education context and how to build service success in uncertain times
  • Connecting with the student perspective
  • Working with professional associations
  • Culture, values and change: observations from three consortia in Canada
  • Managing complex change collaboratively and creatively
  • Leaders and influencing skills of the future
  • The role of technology in enabling collaboration and the role of shared data in extending the library’s value
  • Space: changing the boundaries and the communal nature of the academic library
  • Collaborative service provision through super-convergence
  • Joint use libraries and transformational change.  
Readership: Library leaders and practitioners and students of LIS.

1. The changing higher education context - Rebecca Davies, Aberystwyth University, UK
2. Connecting with the student perspective - Craig Gaskell, University of Hull, UK
3. Working with professional associations - Andrew West, University of Sheffield, UK and Raegan Hiles, AMOSSHE, UK
4. Culture, values and change: observations from three consortia in Canada - Michael Ridley
5. Managing complex change collaboratively - Margaret Weaver, University of Cumbria, UK
6. Leadership skills for collaboration: future needs and challenges - Sue Roberts, State Library of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia, and Rachel Esson,Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
7. Knowing me...knowing you: the role of technology in enabling collaboration - Graham Stone and Dave Pattern, both at University of Huddersfield, UK
8. Space: changing the boundaries - Liz Jolly, Teesside University, UK
9. Collaborative service provision through super-convergence - Maxine Melling, University of Gloucestershire, UK
10. Joint-use libraries and transformational change - Ruth Kifer, University Library, San José State University, USA

"Teamwork is a vital element in many environments, especially in library education. Collaboration in Libraries and Learning Environments discusses the role of libraries in higher education and their role in this shifting environment. Support is the primary aspect of many libraries in higher education now, and with the advent and advancement of internet methods, libraries must be on the ever cutting edge to reach out to their patrons. With advice on how to build these services when it's unsure what the next year will bring, understanding the needs of the student, leadership within the library, working with other libraries, collaboration, and much more...Collaboration in Libraries and Learning Environments is a strongly recommended read for library science collections, not to be missed."


- Midwest Book Review

Maxine Melling BA DipLib Mlib MCLIP is Director of Learning and Information Services at Liverpool John Moores University. 


Joyce Little BA MBA MCLIP is Head of Libraries and Information Services at Liverpool City Council.
",044493Maxine Melling is Director of Library and Student Support at Liverpool John Moores University,045353"Maxine Melling is Director of Library and Student Support at Liverpool John Moores University 

Margaret Weaver is Head of Learning, Information and Student Services at the University of Cumbria

1. The changing higher education context - Rebecca Davies, Aberystwyth University, UK

This chapter focuses on how we prepare for the changing environment(s) for higher education institutions (HEIs), with particular note to libraries and professional support services.  The chapter begins by scanning the horizon and then goes on to consider what it means to be a student or staff member in an HEI.  Possible options for future success are then mapped and implications for collaboration and new ways of working are highlighted.

2. Connecting with the student perspective - Craig Gaskell, University of Hull, UK

Motivated by student feedback, the Scarborough Campus of the University of Hull realised that their model of service delivery could be improved, particularly from a student interface perspective. Their existing approach suited the university looking from its structures outwards rather than the students looking in. A review recommended a radical restructure of campus administration and support functions, development of a new highly streamlined approach to student interaction and a redesign of the spaces critical to that activity. It yielded a new library and reset it as the focal point of interaction with students at the heart of the campus. This chapter describes the fundamental shift in approach at Scarborough and reflects on the impact two years on from starting the changes process.

3. Working with professional associations - Andrew West, University of Sheffield, and Raegan Hiles, AMOSSHE, UK

This chapter focuses specifically on professional associations supporting the entire HE student experience. The current array of professional groupings, including those in the area of libraries and information management, are examined and the way in which the professional associations operate and collaborate to support students holistically is examined.  A case study approach is used, focussing on AMOSSHE, The Student Services Organisation.  The chapter then explores how one higher education institution, the University of Sheffield, encourages and benefits from interacting with professional associations in the area of the student experience, before considering the potential future scenarios for this group of professional associations, drawing on a number of international exemplars, by way of contrast and comparison. 

4. Culture, values and change: observations from three consortia in Canada - Michael Ridley

This chapter examines the nature and importance of values and culture by investigating the implementation and sustainability of three Canadian collaborations: the TriUniversity Group of Libraries (TUG), the Scholars Portal of the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL) and the Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN). These three initiatives, while different in scale, approach and focus, share common characteristics which have made them successful. Their longevity (each one is more than ten years old) is evidence of a strong foundation and an ability to adapt.

5. Managing complex change collaboratively - Margaret Weaver, University of Cumbria, UK

The Higher Education Academy (HEA) and the Leadership Foundation for Higher Education (LFHE) supports UK higher education institutions (HEIs) in achieving complex cultural change through their annual Change Academy (CA) programme. This chapter describes the creation of a new collaborative network of academic libraries in the north of England following an intensive cross-institutional planning initiative and presence at the HEA CA Conference and subsequent work in 2010–11, which launched the COLLABORATE! project and the Northern Collaboration (NC). The process enabled the vision of key individuals to be converted into a tangible entity. The interplay between creative thinking, conceptual activity, teamwork and action is thought to be a constructive way to bring about complex change. The chapter describes the thinking behind the approach, and how this was achieved at a time of volatility (and opportunity) in higher education (HE).

6. Leadership skills for collaboration: future needs and challenges - Sue Roberts, State Library of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia, and Rachel Esson,Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

This book explores the changing context of public services, and more specifically higher education, arguing that collaboration is the critical issue for the ongoing transformation and success of libraries, learning environments and learning services. This chapter explores these new demands on the people who work, and who potentially will work, in such services. Its central argument is that leadership development for collaboration, rather than leadership in general, is the single biggest issue and the single greatest lever for success in the future. Leadership and leaders at all levels are required when working across boundaries and when working in an increasingly diverse environment. This chapter explores this challenging issue in a global context, a context that demands increased flexibility when collaborating with diverse professional groups and where the boundaries of territory and service delivery become increasingly permeable. It explores and provides models to help us consider these skills, attributes and behaviours indicating that certain approaches are transferable, transformational and sustainable across many kinds of libraries and learning environments. It also discusses the significance of diversity and difference for leadership and suggest ways in which we can develop as individuals and as organizations in order to ensure effective collaboration and boundary crossing.

7. Knowing me...knowing you: the role of technology in enabling collaboration - Graham Stone and Dave Pattern, University of Huddersfield, UK

This chapter uses the University of Huddersfield as an example of how technology has allowed libraries of all kinds to work more collaboratively and analyses to what extent these developments have been successful. It focuses on the broad approaches that are being used via innovative technology and rich media to both reach and understand our customers, as well as how developments in the community (e.g. open data, social media, open publishing, repositories and shared services) have enabled the sharing, use and re-use of information, data and objects. The chapter examines a selection of projects that have been inspired by the use of technology and social media at the University of Huddersfield in order to enrich the student experience. These projects have either been borne out of collaboration or inspired by the spirit of collaboration and sharing with others over a period of ten years (Brook et al., 2002; Stone, Ramsden and Pattern, 2011a; JISC, 2008; Sero, 2009; Pattern et al., 2010; Copac, 2012). The chapter shows the importance of both collaboration and the sharing of data and discusses this in the context of collaboration on a national scale, for which Huddersfield’s Computing and Library Services (CLS) staff have a national and international reputation.

8. Space: changing the boundaries - Liz Jolly, Teesside University, UK

This chapter considers developments in collaborative approaches to the enhancement of academic library space. First, these developments are viewed in the context of changes in higher education, learning and teaching and technology. The second section considers examples of collaborative approaches and the final section of the chapter attempts to evaluate these developments in terms of learning enhancement, rather than of space efficiency. While it is crucial to integrate physical and virtual learning spaces, this chapter will focus on physical library spaces.

9. Collaborative service provision through super-convergence - Maxine Melling, University of Gloucestershire, UK

This chapter explores the drivers influencing the adoption of super-convergence, considers the varying models of super-convergence and offers a commentary on the challenges and opportunities facing leaders of super-converged services, with examples provided and with particular reference to the author’s then service team at Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU).

10. Joint-use libraries and transformational change - Ruth Kifer, University Library, San José State University, USA

This chapter the issues concerning joint-use libraries and charts the course for ongoing successful collaborations between university and public libraries as an effective and cost-efficient means in today’s learning environments and volatile world economy.