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Digital Curation, 2nd edition

Apr 2016 | 256pp

Paperback
9781783300976
Price: £59.95
CILIP members price: £47.96


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Digital Curation, 2nd edition

Gillian Oliver and Ross Harvey

This second edition of Digital Curation outlines the essential concepts and techniques that are crucial to preserving the longevity of digital resources.

The first edition of this textbook provided in-depth explanation of the entire digital curation lifecycle, from creation to appraisal to preservation to organization/access to transformation and set a benchmark for both thoroughness and clarity.  In this revamped and expanded second edition, international authorities Gillian Oliver and Ross Harvey have widened the scope to address continuing developments in the strategies, technological approaches, and activities that are part of this rapidly changing field.

Useful as both a teaching text and day-to-day working guide, this book outlines the essential concepts and techniques that are crucial to preserving the longevity of digital resources and covers topics including:

  • the scope and incentives of digital curation, detailing Digital Curation Centre’s (DCC) lifecycle model as well as the Data Curation Continuum
  • key requirements for digital curation, from description and representation to planning and collaboration
  • the value and utility of metadata
  • creating an appraisal and selection policy for digital objects that considers the needs of producers and consumers when
  • the paradigm shift by institutions towards cloud computing and its impact on costs, storage, and other key aspects of digital curation
  • the quality and security of data
  • new and emerging data curation resources, including innovative digital repository software and digital forensics tools
  • mechanisms for sharing and reusing data, with expanded sections on open access, open data, and open standards initiatives
  • processes to ensure that data are preserved and remain usable over time.

Readership: This book will be essential reading for any information professional, records manager or archivists who appraises, selects, organizes, or maintains digital resources and has responsibilities as a digital curator.

List of Figures 
List of Abbreviations 
Preface 
Acknowledgments 

PART I - DIGITAL CURATION: SCOPE AND INCENTIVES

1. Introduction
2. The Changing Landscape
3. Conceptual Models
4. Defining Data

PART II - KEY REQUIREMENTS FOR DIGITAL CURATION

5. Curation and Curators
6. Description and Representation Information
7. Preservation Planning and Policy
8. Sharing Knowledge and Collaborating

PART III - THE DIGITAL CURATION LIFECYCLE IN ACTION

9. Designing Data
10. Creating Data
11. Deciding What Data to Keep
12. Ingesting Data
13. Preserving Data
14. Storing Data
15. Using and Reusing Data

About the Authors
Index

 

“a high-level overview of all the activities comprising digital curation  ... the emphasis on conceptual modelling as an essential step in understanding and practising digital curation is one of the particular strengths of Oliver and Harvey’s text.”
- Alexandria 

Gillian Oliver is an academic at the School of Information Management, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. Her PhD is from Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Her research interests centre on organisational culture, and the influences this has on the way that information is managed. She is the co-author of Records Management and Information Culture (Facet 2014) and a Co-editor in Chief of the journal Archival Science.

Ross Harvey is Adjunct Professor at RMIT University and the University of South Australia.

Part I: Digital Curation: Scope and Incentives

1. Introduction

Chapter 1 sets the scene for digital curation and argues that it is central to professional practice in all digital environments. It begins by indicating why digital curation is necessary, then identifies what it encompasses, suggests why an interest in digital curation is important, notes the main incentives for digital curation, and examines the tasks that comprise digital curation and who carries them out.

2. The Changing Landscape

Chapter 2 focuses on the characteristics of the changing landscape in which librarians, archivists, researchers, and scholars work, the requirements for different ways of working and new kinds of infrastructure, and the need for new kinds of skill sets for data curation.

3. Conceptual Models

Chapter 3 describes the application of conceptual models to digital curation. The Digital Curation Centre (DCC) Curation Lifecycle Model outlines the actions that comprise digital curation and presents these actions in graphic form. This Lifecycle Model is used as the structural basis of parts II and III of this book. The Open Archival Information System (OAIS) Reference Model is widely used as the basis for the design and implementation of digital archival systems. An alternative perspective, the data curation continuum, is also introduced.

4. Defining Data

Chapter 4 describes in more detail the meaning of the term data and other related terms. Investigating the meaning of the term data is particularly important if a key question is to be answered satisfactorily: What exactly is it that we want to curate?

Part II: Key Requirements for Digital Curation

5. Curation and Curators

Chapter 5 covers the Full Lifecycle Action Curate and Preserve. It examines what digital curation aims to do, gives an overview of how these aims are achieved, and reviews the roles of data creator, users, and curator.

6. Description and Representation Information

Chapter 6 examines the Full Lifecycle Action Description and Representation Information—the metadata and other information that are essential for effective data curation.            

7. Preservation Planning and Policy

Chapter 7 explores the essential nature of planning in data curation by describing another Full Lifecycle Action, Preservation Planning. It describes the need for planning at all stages of curation, and emphasizes the importance of developing policy and documenting costs of digital curation.

8. Sharing Knowledge and Collaborating

Chapter 8 completes the examination of Full Lifecycle Actions by describing the role of and key activities associated with Community Watch and Participation—the process of keeping up to date and participating in developments to advance and improve curation activities.

Part III: The Digital Curation Lifecycle in Action

9. Designing Data

Chapter 9 focuses on the first Sequential Action, Conceptualise. It emphasizes the need to think about curation at the very first stages of planning research, digitizing, or any other data creation activity that is carried out with digital curation processes and outcomes in mind.

10. Creating Data

Chapter 10 examines the second Sequential Action Create or Receive, noting the requirements for curation-ready data. Whereas chapter 9 outlines the nature of the planning required to ensure that we have “good” data and comprehensive data management plans so that curation is effective, this chapter explains the principles and practices of making data curation-ready.

11. Deciding What Data to Keep

Chapter 11 describes Appraise and Select, the third Sequential Action, noting the importance of selection of the digital objects to be curated. It examines the processes of developing criteria for the determination of which data sets and digital objects should be kept for the long term and which should be discarded, and then applying those criteria. This chapter also reviews the Occasional Actions Reappraise and Dispose, both closely related to the Appraise action.

12. Ingesting Data

The topic of chapter 12 is the fourth Sequential Action, Ingest. Ingest refers to the processes of preparing digital objects for adding to a digital archive and of adding them to the digital archive

13. Preserving Data

Chapter 13 discusses the preservation strategies and actions associated with Preservation Action, the fifth Sequential Action. This is the process of ensuring long-term preservation and retention of digital objects and includes activities aimed at ensuring that they are authentic, reliable, and usable over time, while at the same time retaining their integrity. Also included in this chapter is the Occasional Action Migrate.

14. Storing Data

Chapter 14 focuses on the sixth Sequential Action, Store, which is concerned with what is required to provide acceptable data storage in the archiving system.

15. Using and Reusing Data

Chapter 15 covers Access, Use, and Reuse, the seventh Sequential Action, and Transform, the eighth and final Sequential Action. Access, Use, and Reuse is the process of ensuring that data is accessible to authorized users for use and also later reuse. Transform, most frequently the outcome of the Access, Use, and Reuse action, refers to the process of creating new data from the original data.